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Nov 03
2010

Musical Therapy: Why It Works

Posted by: jay11284 in Alternative Medicine

Tagged in: Music Therapy

jay11284

 

You know that feeling you get when you hear that certain song? Some songs have the ability to lift up your spirits and make you feel better. More and more this feeling is being utilized to help treat patients using something doctors call Music Therapy. As defined by the American Music Therapy Association Music Therapy is: "the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program."

What Does Music Therapy Help With?

  • Research and patient feedback suggests that Music Therapy may:
  • Alleviate Pain
  • Regulate Heart Rate and Blood Pressure
  • Improve Breathing 
  • Ease Anxiety
  • Reduce Depression
  • Enhance Overall Quality of Life

Is There Supporting Research?

Numerous scientific research studies support the use of music in medical settings. From research, to patient feedback, music therapy works wonders for many patients. Some music therapy sessions are one-to-one while some are done with family settings or in a group atmosphere.

Are Music Therapists Trained & Certified?

All music therapists must pass a National Board Certification exam after they complete an accredited university program and internship. Music therapists keep learning as they grow and studies are done too. They research current music psychotherapy techniques for pain relief, wellness, stress management and breathing techniques.

Is it Just Music?

Music Therapy is more than just playing songs for the sick. Different sicknesses warrant different kinds and styles of music. Each patient that goes for music therapy has certain needs that the music therapists listens too. Often visuals aids are added into the music therapy session.

Music Therapy helps calm a person in a natural way without the use of drugs and chemicals. 

 

 

 

Comments (4)Add Comment
waterbottle
...
written by waterbottle, Wednesday, 08:37 PM, November 03, 2010
I can see how music helps change mood and create brain stimulation, but I'm not sure how it can help alleviate pain.

MichaelSwedenberg
...
written by MichaelSwedenberg, Thursday, 01:31 PM, November 04, 2010
I'm no expert but this is what I learned:

Music therapy as an intervention to address perceived pain due to surgery. It can be beneficial to patients physically and psychologically. Hospitalization may result in physical stress from invasive surgery and therapies, as well as emotional stress due to unexpected news, unfamiliar environments, and a sense of losing control. There are several theories about how music therapy positively affects perceived pain:

1. Music serves as a distracter.
2. Music may give the patient a sense of control.
3. Music causes the body to release endorphins to counteract pain.
4. Slow music relaxes a person by slowing their breathing and heartbeat.
alwaysRT
...
written by alwaysRT, Thursday, 03:57 PM, November 04, 2010
I found this shortly after reading this.

http://www.prevention.com/doctorsbookofhomeremedies/11.html

"Home cure: iPod

Use it for: High blood pressure

Thirty minutes of the right tunes every day can help lower BP, according to research from the University of Florence in Italy. Researchers found that people on a medication for hypertension further lowered their blood pressure after they listened to music while breathing slowly. Systolic readings (the first number) decreased an average of 3.2 points in a week; a month later, readings were down 4.4 points."

There is music therapy at work!
alwaysRT
...
written by alwaysRT, Thursday, 06:08 PM, November 04, 2010
I found this shortly after reading this.

http://www.prevention.com/doctorsbookofhomeremedies/11.html

"Home cure: iPod

Use it for: High blood pressure

Thirty minutes of the right tunes every day can help lower BP, according to research from the University of Florence in Italy. Researchers found that people on a medication for hypertension further lowered their blood pressure after they listened to music while breathing slowly. Systolic readings (the first number) decreased an average of 3.2 points in a week; a month later, readings were down 4.4 points."

There is music therapy at work!

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